PSYC Course Listing

Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 100, 3 Credits)

A survey of the basic principles, research concepts, and problems in psychological science. The biological, cognitive, and social perspectives of human thought and behavior are addressed. The goal is to apply major concepts and use the scientific method to enhance the understanding of individual, community, and organizational life experiences. Topics include neuroscience, sensation and perception, learning and conditioning, memory, motivation, language and intelligence, personality and social behavior, and psychopathology and therapy. Applications of psychology are also presented. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 101 or PSYC 100.

Research Methods in Psychology (PSYC 300, 3 Credits)

Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and STAT 200. A survey of research methods focusing on the fundamentals of research design and behavior. The aim is to apply research methodologies critically and creatively to communicate effectively about the domains of psychology. Topics include scientific writing using APA style, evaluation of research literature, and ethical issues in research. Practice is provided in asking research questions, formulating research hypotheses, designing and conducting a simulated research study, and presenting results. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: PSYC 300 or PSYC 305.

Biological Basis of Behavior (PSYC 301, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An introduction to the anatomical structures and physiological processes that determine behavior. The objective is to use scientifically valid resources to communicate effectively about the biological basis of behavior. Topics include the acquisition and processing of sensory information, the neural control of movement, and the biological bases of complex behaviors (such as sleep, learning, memory, sex, and language), as well as the basic functioning of the nervous system.

Special Topics in Psychology (PSYC 306, 1 Credits)

Seminar discussion of topics of current interest. Areas explored may extend or augment those covered in more general topical courses. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.

Special Topics in Biological Psychology (PSYC 307, 1 Credits)

Seminar discussion of topics of current interest. Areas explored may extend or augment those covered in more general topical courses. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.

Special Topics in Social Psychology (PSYC 308, 1 Credits)

Seminar discussion of topics of current interest. Areas explored may extend or augment those covered in more general topical courses. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.

Special Topics in Professional Psychology (PSYC 309, 1 Credits)

Seminar discussion of topics of current interest. The goal is to attain specialized knowledge in a particular area of professional psychology. Topics may extend or augment those covered in more general courses. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.

Ethics in Mental Health and Psychological Treatment (PSYC 309X, 1 Credits)

A general introduction to ethical considerations in the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders. The objective is to apply knowledge of ethics in evaluating psychological research and case studies. Topics include confidentiality, dual relationships, credentialing, recordkeeping, informed consent, and legal concerns.

Sensation and Perception (PSYC 310, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300 and 301. A survey of theories and historical and contemporary research in how the auditory, visual, gustatory, olfactory, kinesthetic, and tactile senses acquire information and how psychological, anatomical, physiological, and environmental factors help us perceive the world. The objective is to apply an understanding of complex neural and behavioral processes to evaluate research and analyze variations within and between species.

Social Psychology (PSYC 321, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An examination of the influence of social factors on individual and interpersonal behaviors. The objective is to analyze the underlying causes of individual and group behavior and the ways in which group attitudes and behaviors are related. Topics include conformity, attitudinal change, personal perception, and group behavior. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 221, BEHS 421, BEHS 450, PSYC 221, or PSYC 321.

Psychology of Human Sexuality (PSYC 332, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. An examination of human sexuality and sexual behavior. The objective is to apply knowledge of the physiology and psychology of human sexuality. Topics include sexual anatomy, intimate relationships, sexual health, and sexual identity across the lifespan. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 363, HLTH 377, or PSYC 332.

Theories of Personality (PSYC 335, 3 Credits)

(Formerly PSYC 435.) Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. A study of major theories and perspectives on personality. The goal is to explain and evaluate major concepts in personality. Topics include trait, psychodynamic, behavioral, and humanistic theories. Methods of personality research and relevant findings are also introduced. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: PSYC 335 or PSYC 435.

Psychology of Gender (PSYC 338, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. A survey of the biological, lifespan development, socialization, personality attributes, mental health factors, and special considerations associated with gender. The aim is to apply knowledge of cultural and historical influences relating to gender. Topics include conceptions of gender, gender roles, and gender similarities and differences.

Memory and Cognition (PSYC 341, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An introduction to basic models, methods of research, and findings in the fields of memory, problem solving, and language. The objective is to apply knowledge of cognitive processes to a variety of situations including organizational and educational settings. Both applications and theory are explored.

Foundations of Learning (PSYC 342, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: STAT 200 and PSYC 300. A review and analysis of the major phenomena and theories of human learning. The objective is to provide students with the foundations of learning and practical applications of the theories. Topics include: conditioning, the application of behavior analysis to real-world problems, and laboratory techniques in learning research. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: PSYC 342 or PSYC 441

Lifespan Development (PSYC 351, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An integrated study of the biological, socioemotional, and cognitive development of humans from conception through death. The aim is to apply knowledge of lifespan development to interpersonal, community, and organizational relationships. Emphasis is on the interaction of nature and nurture on one's physiology, capability, and potential at each progressive stage of development.

Child and Adolescent Psychology (PSYC 352, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An examination of research and theory focusing on psychological development, from conception through adolescence. The objective is to apply knowledge of child and adolescent development through critical and creative analysis of cases and situations. Topics include physiological, conceptual, and behavioral changes and the social and biological context in which individuals develop. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: PSYC 352, PSYC 355, or PSYC 356.

Abnormal Psychology (PSYC 353, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An examination of mental disorders across the lifespan. The goal is to evaluate emerging issues in abnormal psychology. Topics include the identification and diagnosis of specific disorders and the evolution of treatment protocols. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: PSYC 331, PSYC 353, or PSYC 431.

Cross-Cultural Psychology (PSYC 354, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An examination of the interplay of individual, ethnic, and cultural factors in psychosocial growth and well-being. The aim is to apply analysis of cultural factors to make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Issues of globalization, diversity, cultural bias, and cross-ethnic communication are addressed.

Adulthood and Aging (PSYC 357, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300. An overview of the development of physiological, intellectual, and interpersonal social functioning from early adulthood through the end of life. The objective is to apply knowledge of adult development critically and creatively to explain particular cases. Topics include theory and research in adult development.

Psychology of Stress (PSYC 386, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. An examination of the forces that define and determine the stress response. The aim is to apply stress management techniques to remediate the negative impact of stress. Stress is studied as the product of the interactions among one's social structure, occupational status, and psychological and physiological levels of well-being. The psychological perspective is examined in relation to the stresses produced in a variety of contexts, such as families and work organizations. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 463, HLTH 285, or PSYC 386.

History and Systems (PSYC 415, 3 Credits)

(Recommended as preparation for graduate study in psychology.) Prerequisite: PSYC 300. A study of the origins of psychology in philosophy and biology and the development of psychology as a science in the 19th and 20th centuries. The objective is to apply an understanding of historical context, integrating various communities of thought, to analyze emerging trends in psychology. Discussion covers theorists and theories and the influence of societal events.

Introduction to Counseling Psychology (PSYC 432, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300 and 335. A survey and critical analysis of research and intervention strategies developed and used by counseling psychologists. The goal is to evaluate current trends in content and methodology. Topics include counseling protocols in various applied settings.

Introduction to Clinical Psychology (PSYC 436, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: PSYC 300 and 353. A survey of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies employed by clinical psychologists. The objective is to evaluate current trends in content and methodology. Topics include the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of mental health disorders. Emphasis is on the scientist-practitioner model and the critical analysis of theories and empirical research.

Positive Psychology (PSYC 437, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: PSYC 100. A survey of the science of positive psychology. The aim is to analyze and evaluate theories and applications of positive psychology. Focus is on the unique characteristics of the human experience that contribute to health and well-being. Topics include hope, optimism, human strengths, happiness, flow, and attachment.

Tests and Measurements (PSYC 451, 3 Credits)

Prerequisites: PSYC 100 and 300. An examination of concepts and theories of psychological tests, measurements, and assessments, including their development, evaluation, and use. The goal is to evaluate measurements and determine appropriate applications. Discussion covers social, legal, cultural, and ethical issues in psychological testing.

Senior Seminar in Psychology (PSYC 495, 3 Credits)

(Intended as a final, capstone course to be taken in a student's last 15 credits.) Prerequisites: PSYC 100, PSYC 300 and completion of all requirements for the psychology major. A study of psychology that integrates knowledge gained through previous coursework and experience. The aim is to build on that conceptual foundation through case study, reflective essays, and portfolio development.