MATH Course Listing

Introductory Algebra (MATH 001, 3 Credits)

(Not open to students who have already successfully completed a higher-level mathematics course. Does not apply toward degree requirements. Yields institutional credit only.) Prerequisite: An appropriate result on the placement test. A study of whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals and real numbers, variable expressions, first degree equations, ratio and proportion, percent, and geometry. All topics are employed to solve applied problems. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 001 or UCSP 198 Transitional Mathematics.

Introductory Algebra (MATH 009, 3 Credits)

(Not open to students who have already successfully completed a higher-level mathematics course. Does not apply toward degree requirements. Yields institutional credit only.) A comprehensive review of real number properties and operations, including fractions, percentages, operations with signed numbers, and geometric formulas. The objective is to develop fluency in the language of introductory algebra; develop number sense and estimation skills; and use mathematical modeling to translate, solve, and interpret applied problems. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, equations of lines, graphs on number lines and rectangular coordinate systems, rules of exponents, and operations on polynomials. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 009, MATH 009M, or MATH 100.

Intermediate Algebra (MATH 012, 3 Credits)

(Not open to students who have already successfully completed a higher-level mathematics course. Does not apply toward degree requirements. Yields institutional credit only.) Prerequisite: MATH 009 or an appropriate result on the placement test. A study of problem-solving techniques in intermediate-level algebra. The goal is to demonstrate number sense and estimation skills; interpret mathematical ideas using appropriate terminology; manipulate, evaluate, and simplify real-number and algebraic expressions; and translate, solve, and interpret applied problems. Emphasis is on numbers and algebraic properties, graphing skills, and applications drawn from a variety of areas (such as finance, science, and the physical world). Topics include polynomials; factoring; exponents and their notation; rational expressions and equations; rational exponents and radical expressions; linear, quadratic, and other equations; and inequalities. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 012, MATH 101, MATH 101M, MATH 102, MATH 102M, MATH 199A, or MATH 199M.

College Mathematics (MATH 103, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 012 or approval of the department. This course is not intended for students planning to take MATH 107 or higher-numbered mathematics courses and does not serve as a prerequisite for these courses. This course focuses on data driven applications and the development of critical thinking skills related to mathematics. Topics include problem solving, equations, inequalities, linear systems, graphs, functions, consumer mathematics, financial management, probability and statistics. Additional topics may include set theory, Venn Diagrams, deductive and inductive reasoning, and logic.

Finite Mathematics (MATH 106, 3 Credits)

(Not intended for students planning to take MATH 107 or higher-numbered mathematics courses.) Prerequisite: MATH 012 or an appropriate result on the placement test. A study of mathematical models in finite mathematics, including linear models, systems of linear equations, linear programming, sets and counting, probability, descriptive statistics, and the mathematics of finance. The aim is to demonstrate fluency in the language of finite mathematics; find, solve, and graph linear equations and inequalities; describe sample spaces and event; assign probabilities to events and apply probability rules; and apply the mathematics of finance to formulate and solve problems.

College Algebra (MATH 107, 3 Credits)

(The first course in the two-course series MATH 107-108. An alternative to MATH 115). Prerequisite: MATH 012 or an appropriate result on the placement test. An introduction to equations and inequalities and a study of functions and their properties, including the development of graphing skills with polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. The objective is to apply appropriate technology and demonstrate fluency in the language of algebra; communicate mathematical ideas; perform operations on real numbers, complex numbers, and functions; solve equations and inequalities; analyze and graph circles and functions; and use mathematical modeling to translate, solve, and interpret applied problems. Technology is used for data modeling. Discussion also covers applications. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 107 or MATH 115.

Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry (MATH 108, 3 Credits)

(The second course in the two-course series MATH 107-108. An alternative to MATH 115.) Prerequisite: MATH 107 or an appropriate result on the placement test. An introduction to trigonometric functions, identities, and equations and their applications. The goal is to demonstrate fluency in the language of trigonometry, analytic geometry, and selected mathematical topics; communicate mathematical ideas appropriately; apply and prove trigonometric identities; solve triangles and trigonometric equations; and perform vector operations. Discussion covers analytical geometry and conic sections, systems of linear equations, matrices, sequences, and series. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 108 or MATH 115.

Pre-Calculus (MATH 115, 3 Credits)

(Not open to students who have completed MATH 140 or any course for which MATH 140 is a prerequisite.) Prerequisite: MATH 012 or an appropriate result on the placement test. An explication of equations, functions, and graphs. The goal is to demonstrate fluency in pre-calculus; communicate mathematical ideas appropriately; solve equations and inequalities; analyze and graph functions; and use mathematical modeling to translate, solve, and interpret applied problems. Topics include polynomials, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, and analytical geometry. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 107, MATH 108, or MATH 115.

Calculus A (MATH 130, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 108, MATH 115, or an appropriate result on the placement test. An introduction to calculus. Topics include functions, continuity, derivatives, and applications of derivatives including maximum-minimum problems, related rates and graphs of functions. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 130, MATH 140, or MATH 220.

Calculus B (MATH 131, 3 Credits)

(A continuation of MATH 130.) Prerequisite: MATH 130. A study of definite and indefinite integrals. Topics include calculations of area between curves; applications of integrals (including volumes, arc length, surface, work, and moments; area in polar coordinates; exponential, logarithmic, inverse trigonometric, and hyperbolic functions; and integration by parts. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 131, MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 220, or MATH 221.

Calculus I (MATH 140, 4 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 108 or MATH 115. An introduction to calculus. The goal is to demonstrate fluency in the language of calculus; discuss mathematical ideas appropriately; and solve problems by identifying, representing, and modeling functional relationships. Topics include functions, the sketching of graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and applications of the derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, and calculation of area. Students may receive credit for only one of the follow_ing courses: MATH 130, MATH 131, or MATH 140.

Calculus II (MATH 141, 4 Credits)

(A continuation of MATH 140.) Prerequisite: MATH 140. A study of integration and functions. The aim is to demonstrate flu_ency in the language of calculus; discuss mathematical ideas appropriately; model and solve problems using integrals and interpret the results; and use infinite series to approximate functions to model real-world scenarios. Focus is on techniques of integration, improper integrals, and applications of integra_tion (such as volumes, work, arc length, and moments); inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and sequences and series. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 131, MATH 132, or MATH 141.

Introduction to Linear Algebra (MATH 240, 4 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 140. An explication of the basic concepts of linear algebra. The aim is to analyze and evaluate matrices to determine solvability and solve systems of linear equations. Topics include systems of linear equations, linear transformations, vectors, vector spaces, matrix separations, products and separations, subspaces, bases, and linear independence. Discussion also covers solutions of problems in physics, engineering, and the sciences. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH 240, MATH 400, or MATH 461.

Calculus III (MATH 241, 4 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 141. An introduction to multivariable calculus. Exposition covers vectors and vector-valued functions; partial derivatives and applications of partial derivatives (such as tangent planes and Lagrangian multipliers); multiple integrals; volume; surface area; and the classical theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. The objective is to use multivariate calculus to solve real-world problems.

Differential Equations (MATH 246, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 141 or MATH 132. An introduction to the basic methods of solving differential equations. The goal is to demonstrate fluency in the language of differential equations; communicate mathematical ideas; solve boundary-value problems for first- and second-order equations; and solve systems of linear differential equations. Topics include solutions of boundary-value problems for first- and second-order differential equations; solutions of systems of linear differential equations; series solutions, existence, and uniqueness; and formulation and solution of differential equations for physical systems.