GERM Course Listing

Elementary German I (GERM 111, 3 Credits)

For online sections, microphone, speakers, and occasional synchronous work required. (Not open to native speakers of German: assumes no prior knowledge of German. Students with prior experience with the German language should take a placement test to assess appropriate level.) An introduction to the German language. The objective is to communicate in German in some concrete, real-life situations using culturally appropriate language. Aspects of German life and culture are explored through the German language. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 101 or GERM 111.

Elementary German II (GERM 112, 3 Credits)

For online sections, microphone, speakers, and occasional synchronous work required. (Not open to native speakers of German.) Prerequisite: GERM 111 or appropriate score on a placement test. A continued introduction to spoken and written German. The goal is to communicate in German in concrete, real-life situations relating to oneself and others. German culture and language are explored. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 102 or GERM 112.

Spoken German (GERM 198RB, 1 Credits)

(Prerequisite: GERM 112) A confidence-building seminar that will allow you to practice orally the German you've learned in German 111 and 112. This course will help you apply and solidify the vocabulary and structures of the previous courses in a variety of purely conversational settings. "Spoken German" will also improve your listening comprehension skills as well as your pronunciation and intonation, replacing possible moments of anxiety in speaking the language with a feeling of confidence and excitement resulting from successful communication in German.

Intermediate German I (GERM 211, 3 Credits)

For online sections, microphone, speakers, and occasional synchronous work required. Prerequisite: GERM 112 or appropriate score on placement test. Further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in German. The aim is to communicate in German in real-life situations and social contexts in culturally appropriate ways Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 114, GERM 201, or GERM 211.

Intermediate German II (GERM 212, 3 Credits)

For online sections, microphone, speakers, and occasional synchronous work required. Prerequisite: GERM 211 or appropriate score on placement test. Further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in German. The objective is to interact effectively with German-speaking individuals in a variety of personal settings and on issues of topical interest in culturally appropriate ways. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 115, GERM 202, or GERM 212.

Intermediate Conversation (GERM 250, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: GERM 212. Further development of conversational skills in German. Focus is on comprehending and responding to questions seeking concrete information (such as personal background, interests, needs, family, and work), comprehending media announcements and reports, and describing visual situations. Emphasis is on vocabulary building and idiomatic expression. Short readings from a variety of increasingly sophisticated formal and informal sources are used. Students who have already successfully completed GERM 201 may not earn credit for this course.

Advanced German I (GERM 311, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: GERM 212 or appropriate score on placement test. An in-depth review and expansion of German language communication skills. The aim is to express opinions and use narration and description in a variety of personal and professional contexts. Focus is on improving linguistic proficiency while increasing cultural awareness. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 301 or GERM 311.

Advanced German II (GERM 312, 3 Credits)

For online sections, microphone, speakers, and occasional synchronous work required. Prerequisite: GERM 311 or appropriate score on placement test. Continued in-depth review and expansion of communication skills in German. The goal is to deliver detailed reports and discuss current topics in a variety of personal and professional contexts. Focus is on improving linguistic proficiency while increasing cultural awareness. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 302 or GERM 312.

Modern German-Speaking Cultures (GERM 314, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: GERM 212 or appropriate score on placement test. An overview of contemporary life and culture in the German-speaking world, taught entirely in German. The objective is to demonstrate intercultural communication skills, recognize aspects of German-speaking cultures and their significance to global society, and employ strategies to enhance language development and cultural awareness. Discussion covers the social, historical, and political experience of the German-speaking people.

Commercial and Workplace German (GERM 318, 4 Credits)

Prerequisite: GERM 212 or equivalent German proficiency. A study of business terminology, vocabulary, formats, and practices. Emphasis is on everyday spoken and written workplace German, using authentic text from native speakers. Written and oral practice is provided in finding and communicating information, especially on commercial topics in business and other workplace situations. Assignments include a project involving specific vocabulary, forms of professional communication, and cultural protocols relevant to the student's workplace or major.

Survey of German Literature I (GERM 321, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A survey of German literature from the 8th century Hildebrandslied to the end of the 18th century.

German Society and Culture (GERM 333, 3 Credits)

(Taught in English; no knowledge of German required.) A study of contemporary German society and German culture as embodied in its literary, artistic, and social traditions. The aim is to articulate the historical roots and key developments that shape contemporary German society, recognize and distinguish unique German influences and contributions, and use and interpret a variety of sources to illustrate and explain key aspects of German society and culture, past and present. Focus is on developing an understanding of German society and culture for practical and professional application using a variety of cultural texts, ranging from political manifestos to literature and art. Various historic and contemporary sources are examined for research and analysis. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: GERM 333 and GERM 334.

Advanced Composition I (GERM 401, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Any 300 level GERM course taught in German or appropriate score on placement test and/or permission of department. Development of written skills in German. Vocabulary enrichment is gained through an in-depth study of word formation, compounds, derivatives, and word-fields, with emphasis on the basic as well as figurative meanings of words. The refinement of rhetorical forms is also covered.

Advanced Composition II (GERM 402, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Any 300 level GERM course taught in German or appropriate score on placement test and/or permission of department. Further development of written skills in German. Vocabulary enrichment is gained through an in-depth study of word formation, compounds, derivatives, and word-fields, with emphasis on the basic as well as figurative meanings of words. The refinement of rhetorical forms is also covered.

German Language of Today: Post-War Texts Both (GERM 419, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: GERM 302 and permission of department. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.

Theory and Practice of German Idioms (GERM 439, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) Specialized study of one great German writer or relevant topics of literary criticism.

German Literature in the 18th Century I (GERM 441, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of the principal works of the "Storm and Stress" movement in 18th century German literature.

German Literature in the 18h Century II (GERM 442, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of the principal works of German classicism during the Enlightenment.

German Literature in the 19th Century I (GERM 451, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of German literature of the 19th century, focusing on German romanticism.

German Literature in the 19th Century II (GERM 452, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of German realism from Hebbel to Fontane.

German Literature in the 20th Century I (GERM 461, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of early 20th century German literature from the realism of Gerhard Hauptmann to Expressionism.

German Literature in the 20th Century II (GERM 462, 3 Credits)

(Conducted in German.) A study of late 20th century German literature, focusing on literary and philosophical movements from Expressionism to the present.

"Deutsche Maerchen": Fairy Tales in German Literature (GERM 469, 3 Credits)

A historical survey of German fairy tales from their roots in the oral tradition of the lower class, to the Grimm Brothers.

Internship in German Through Co-op (GERM 486A, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Co-op program (program requirements are listed on p. 00). An opportunity to combine academic theory with new, career-related experience in German language. At least 12 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks for a minimum of 180 hours during the Co-op session; four new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks and objectives related to German language and that continues to advance application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may earn up to 15 semester hours in all internship coursework through Co-op toward a first bachelor's degree and up to 9 semester hours toward a second bachelor's degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and minor (combined).

Internship in German Through Co-op (GERM 486B, 6 Credits)

Prerequisite: Formal admission to the Co-op program (program requirements are listed on p. 00). An opportunity to combine academic theory with new, career-related experience in German language. At least 20 hours per week must be devoted to new tasks for a total of 300 hours during the Co-op session; five to eight new tasks must be delineated in the Learning Proposal; and the course requirements must be completed. May be repeated upon approval of a new Learning Proposal that demonstrates new tasks and objectives related to German language and that continues to advance application of academic theory in the workplace. Students may earn up to 15 semester hours in all internship coursework through Co-op toward a first bachelor's degree and up to 9 semester hours toward a second bachelor's degree. Co-op credits may not be used for general education requirements and, unless otherwise specified, no more than 6 Co-op credits may be used in the academic major and minor (combined).