ECON Course Listing

Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 201, 3 Credits)

An introductory study of the macroeconomy. The objective is to apply select macroeconomic theories to real-world situations. Discussion covers economic growth, technological innovation, unemployment, inflation, and the roles of monetary policy and fiscal policy in determining macroeconomic performance. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ECON 201 or ECON 205.

Principles of Microeconomics (ECON 203, 3 Credits)

An analysis of the economic principles underlying the behavior of individual consumers and business firms. The goal is to apply select microeconomic theories to real-world situations. Emphasis is on market theory. Topics include the implications of government intervention, technological innovation, the advantages and disadvantages of different market structures, and income distribution and poverty.

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy (ECON 305, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201. An analysis of the forces that determine a nation's income, employment, and price levels. The aim is to analyze macroeconomic indicators and trends and evaluate their impact. Topics include consumption, investment, inflation, and governmental fiscal and monetary policy. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ECON 305, ECON 403, or ECON 405.

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (ECON 306, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 203. An analysis of the principles underlying the behavior of individual consumers and business firms. The objective is to analyze microeconomic indicators and trends and evaluate their impact. Discussion covers theories of welfare, taxation, marketing systems, and income distribution. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ECON 306 or ECON 403.

Money and Banking (ECON 430, 3 Credits)

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 203. An examination of the structure of financial institutions and their role in providing money and near money. The goal is to evaluate how the banking and business environment has changed, describe the functions and measurement of money, discuss and evaluate the money supply creation process, and analyze the impact of the Federal Reserve's policies on both the U.S. economy and the economies of other nations. Topics include the composition of the Federal Reserve, the money supply creation process, the tools of monetary policy, the term structure of interest rates, the demand for and supply of money, and interest rate theories. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ECON 430 or ECON 431.

International Economics (ECON 440, 3 Credits)

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 203. An examination of international trade and finance theory and their application to contemporary economic issues. The aim is to use economic frameworks to explain international trade and financial flows and analyze information and data on economic policy and institutions. Topics include the costs and benefits of trade, exchange rate markets, global financial imbalances, regional trading blocks, and the role of international economic institutions. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 440, ECON 440, or ECON 441