BIOL Course Listing

Concepts of Biology (BIOL 101, 3 Credits)

(For students not majoring in a science.) An introduction to the structure and function of living organisms. The objective is to use knowledge about biological principles and scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about the natural world. Topics include the chemical foundations of life, cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecosystems, and interdependence of living organisms. Discussion also covers the importance of the scientific method to biological inquiry and the impact of biological knowledge and technology on human societies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Laboratory in Biology (BIOL 102, 1 Credits)

(For students not majoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 101.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 101. A hands-on study of the structure and function of living organisms. The goal is to apply the scientific method and to use scientific and quantitative reasoning to make informed decisions about experimental results in the biological sciences. Laboratory exercises emphasize the scientific method and explore topics such as the chemical foundations of living organisms, cell structure and function, and the classification of organisms. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Introduction to Biology (BIOL 103, 4 Credits)

(Not open to students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 102. For students not majoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) An introduction to the structure and function of living organisms. The aim is to apply the scientific method and use scientific and quantitative reasoning to make informed decisions about experimental results in the biological sciences. Topics include the chemical foundations of life, cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecosystems, and interdependence of living organisms. Discussion also covers the importance of the scientific method to biological inquiry and the impact of biological knowledge and technology on human societies. Laboratory activities emphasize the scientific method. Students may receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 101-102, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Principles of Biology I (BIOL 105, 4 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) An introduction to the basic principles of biology, with special emphasis on cellular and molecular biology. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, BOTN 101, BSCI 105, or ZOOL 101.

Principles of Biology II (BIOL 106, 4 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 105. An introduction to the basic principles of biology, with special emphasis on organismic, ecological, and evolutionary biology. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 106, or BSCI 106.

General Botany (BIOL 120, 3 Credits)

(Not for students majoring or minoring in science.) A basic study of plant biology emphasizing an ecological approach. Fundamental concepts and processes of plants are covered. The importance of plant life to humans is stressed. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 120, BOTN 100, BOTN 101, or BOTN 105.

Botany Laboratory (BIOL 121, 1 Credits)

(Not for students majoring or minoring in science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for 120.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 120. An introduction to the taxonomy, anatomy, and physiology of plants, including examination of their evolutionary and ecological interactions.

Human Biology (BIOL 160, 3 Credits)

(Science background not required.) A general introduction to human structure, functions, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The aim is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about topics related to human biology. The human organism is examined from the basic cellular level and genetics, through organ systems, to interaction with the outside world. Discussion also covers pertinent health topics. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 160 or GNSC 160.

Laboratory in Human Biology (BIOL 161, 1 Credits)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 160.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 160. A laboratory study that uses the human organism as an example to illustrate the concepts underlying the organization and interrelationships of all living organisms.

Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL 164, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 105, BIOL 160, or BSCI 105. An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the human organism. Topics include basic concepts of physics and chemistry that are necessary for understanding biological functions and the structure and function of cells, tissues, and the major organ systems in the body. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 164 or GNSC 161.

Life in the Oceans (BIOL 181, 3 Credits)

An introductory study of the major groups of plants and animals in various marine environments, as well as their interactions with each other and the nonliving components of the ocean. The objective is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about topics related to marine biology. Discussion covers the impact of human activity on life in the ocean and the potential uses and misuses of the ocean. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 181 or ZOOL 181.

Marine Biology Laboratory (BIOL 182, 1 Credits)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 181 or NSCI 110.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 181 or NSCI 110. An introduction to the environmental and biological factors that affect life in the oceans, including chemical and physical properties such as salinity, oxygen concentration, depth, tides, currents, and light. The investigations may include field exercises examining life in specific habitats, such as coral reefs, estuaries, and intertidal areas.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL 201, 4 Credits)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 105, BIOL 160, or BSCI 105. A thorough introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems of human beings. An overview of cellular physiology is included. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 201 or ZOOL 201.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL 202, 4 Credits)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 105, BIOL 160, or BSCI 105. An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the sensory, cardiovascular, endocrine, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, excretory, immune, and reproductive systems. Intermediary metabolism and endocrine relationships are also studied. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 202 or ZOOL 202.

Environmental Science (BIOL 211, 3 Credits)

A survey of ecological principles as they apply to the interrelated dilemmas of sustainability. Topics include overpopulation, pollution, over-consumption of natural resources, and the ethics of land use. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 211, BOTN 211, or PBIO 235.

Environmental Science Laboratory (BIOL 212, 1 Credits)

(For students not majoring in science . Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 211.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 211. A laboratory study investigating human interactions with our environment. Scientific objectivity and methodology are employed to gather and analyze data pertaining to the varied and inter-related forms of human environmental impact. Topics explored include principles of ecology, population dynamics, food supply alternatives and impact, sustainable water supplies, energy alternatives, pollution control, greenhouse gases, recycling, and conservation technologies.

Human Genetics (BIOL 220, 3 Credits)

An introduction to the role of genes in inheritance of traits and genetic diseases and disorders. The goal is to understand how genes affect physical appearance and behavior. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance of human genetic diseases, human genetic variation, and mechanisms underlying human diseases. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 220, BIOL 222, or BSCI 222.

Genetics Laboratory (BIOL 224, 1 Credits)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 220 or BIOL 222.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 220 or BIOL 222. A laboratory study of transmission, biochemical, and population genetics. Both living systems and appropriate models are investigated.

General Microbiology (BIOL 230, 4 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or other introductory biology course with laboratory. An investigation of fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry, and biotechnology are considered. Student may receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, BSCI 223, MICB 200, or MICB 388A.

Human Health and Disease (BIOL 301, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) A survey of the mechanisms of disease and their expression in major organ systems of the human body. The goal is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about matters related to human biology and health. Topics include infections, cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, stroke, malnutrition, poisoning by environmental toxins, stress, inflammation, disorders of the immune system, and aging. Emphasis is on analysis of factors that cause disruption of healthy body functions, leading to disease, and on prevention of disease through control of risk factors and early detection. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 301 or BIOL 398H.

Bacteria, Viruses, and Health (BIOL 302, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) An introductory study of the basic structure, genetic and regulatory systems, and life cycles of bacteria and viruses and how they relate to health, infectious disease, and illness. The objective is to apply knowledge of cellular and molecular processes and communicate synthesized knowledge of microbial pathogenesis and disease prevention methods. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, BSCI 223, MICB 200, or MICB 388A.

The Biology of Cancer (BIOL 304, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) An overview of the biological basis of cancer. The goal is to apply knowledge of cancer biology to adopt appropriate lifestyle strategies and evaluate current treatments. The causes, development, and progression of cancer are considered at the level of cell structure and function. The roles of genes and proteins are also examined. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 304 or GNSC 398C.

The Biology of Aging (BIOL 307, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) An overview of the biological basis of aging. The goal is to apply knowledge of the aging process to influence personal lifestyle choices, public health policy, and economic decisions. Topics include typical changes that occur in cells, molecules, metabolism, and structure during the aging process. The development and progression of several diseases associated with aging (including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, osteoporosis, and loss of visual acuity and memory) are discussed with respect to the role of genes, proteins, and environmental influences. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 307 or BIOL 398V.

Forensic Biology (BIOL 320, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) Recommended: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105. An introduction to the basic principles of biology as applied to the field of forensic science. The aim is to use scientific reasoning to draw conclusions and make decisions about forensic techniques, analyses, and results. Topics include the biological features and characteristics of evidentiary materials, as well as the basic principles of chemistry, cell biology, microbiology, and genetics that underlie forensic analyses.

Inquiries in Biological Science (BIOL 325, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or equivalent. An overview of biological principles and current trends in biological science. The goal is to apply knowledge of core biological principles, critically analyze current research, and use scientific reasoning to make evaluative decisions related to applications in the biological sciences. Topics include the scientific process, core biological concepts, careers in biology-related fields, and safety and health policies relevant to biological research.

Bioethics (BIOL 328, 3 Credits)

Recommended: WRTG 101 (or WRTG 101S) and BIOL 101. An introduction to ethical decision making related to human life and health. The aim is to form defensible positions and carefully crafted arguments based on well-supported evidence. Discussion covers reproductive issues, biological research, and health care. Emphasis is on scientific and philosophical thinking.

Molecular and Cellular Biology (BIOL 350, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in a science.) Prerequisite: BIOL 325. A thorough examination of the basic structure and function of cells, with an emphasis on eukaryotic cell biology. The objective is to use knowledge of molecular biology to interpret results and draw conclusions about research findings and technological applications. Topics include cell-cycle growth and death; protein structure; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; gene expression; RNA processing; and molecular transport, traffic, and signaling. Discussion also covers the application of recombinant DNA, genetic engineering, and other current molecular biology technologies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 350 or BIOL 398S.

Bioinformatics (BIOL 357, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in a science.) Prerequisite: BIOL 325 or another upper-level biology course. Recommended: IFSM 201 and MATH 106 (or higher). An introduction to the use of computers in the analysis of nucleic acid and protein sequences and a study of the significance of these analyses. The goal is to develop an understanding of the software used in bioinformatics and learn how to address specific questions in biotechnology and research. Topics include genome analysis, evolutionary relationships, structure-function identification, protein pattern recognition, protein-protein interaction, and algorithms.

Neurobiology (BIOL 362, 3 Credits)

(For students majoring or minoring in a natural science or psychology.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, or BIOL 105. An in-depth discussion of the biology and development of the nervous system. The goal is to apply knowledge of neurobiological principles to advanced studies or careers and be more informed health care consumers. Topics include neuronal structure and function; communication at the synapse; membrane receptors and intra- and intercellular signaling systems; gross organization of the brain and spinal cord; the processing of sensory information; the programming of motor responses; research techniques; ethics; brain development; plasticity; and higher functions such as learning, memory, cognition, and speech.

Special Topics in Biology (BIOL 398, 3 Credits)

A study of topics in biology of special interest to students and faculty. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.

The Ecology of Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vents (BIOL 398D, 1 Credits)

A study of the trench ecosystem and the organisms inhabiting the oceans' deepest biological realm--home of the "black smokers" and the animals who live without benefit of sunlight and its associated photosynthetic activity. Topics include the geological, metabolic, and evolutionary significance of these remote regions; the methods used to study them (including the use of manned and unmanned submersibles); and the possible use of trenches as refuge during global extinction events.

Biology of Coral Reefs (BIOL 398E, 3 Credits)

A study of the coral reef ecosystem with lectures, fieldwork, and lab work. Special attention will be given to the biology of corals, identification of common organisms living on the reef, and their relationship with corals.

The Role of Nutrition in Cancer and Heart Disease (BIOL 398J, 1 Credits)

A study of the relationship between diet and the development of cancer and heart disease at the level of molecules, cells, and genes. The aim is to examine the scientific and epidemiological evidence supporting the roles of various foods, nutrients, antioxidants, fiber, fats, and genetics in the progression or prevention of these two major causes of mortality. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 398J or GNSC 398F.

Wildlife Ecology (BIOL 398N, 1 Credits)

Recommended: BIOL 101 or similar introductory biology course. An overview of the history, science, and public policy of wildlife ecology and management. The goals are to distinguish, analyze, and assess the basic characteristics of wildlife populations and habitats, the significance of wildlife biodiversity to natural and human communities, and the role of human perceptions and policies in protecting and restoring wildlife populations. Topics will include biodiversity, conservation, extirpation, extinction, habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, overharvesting, population dynamics, sustainability, and restoration.

Pesticides and the Environment (BIOL 398P, 1 Credits)

An overview of the history, science, and public policy of pesticide use and management. The goal is to distinguish, analyze, assess, and appraise the impact of pesticides on human health, wildlife populations, and ecosystem functions. Topics include biodiversity, mechanisms of action, genetic resistance, risk assessment, regulatory frameworks, toxicity testing, and social values.

Common Intertidal Animals of Okinawa (BIOL 398Q, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 181. A study of the animals found in tropical and subtropical coral reef environments. Emphasis is on higher taxonomy, field and laboratory identification, and the life history and interaction of various coral reef animals. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 398Q or ZOOL 398Q.

Epidemiology and Communicable Diseases (BIOL 422, 3 Credits)

Prerequisite: BIOL 230, BIOL 301, BIOL 302, or BIOL 398G. Recommended: WRTG 393. An investigation of factors contributing to the emergence of new infectious diseases and the resurgence of diseases once thought to have been controlled. The goal is to synthesize and apply knowledge of research methods, integrate epidemiological information, and communicate knowledge to scientific and nonscientific communities. Topics include socioeconomic and environmental factors that contribute to the inability to prevent or control malaria, tuberculosis, and AIDS. Disease symptoms, patterns of spread, and possible control measures are examined for new infectious diseases (such as Lyme disease and those caused by E. coli O157, the Ebola virus, hantaviruses, and cryptosporidia). Discussion also covers resurgent diseases such as anthrax, bubonic plague, dengue, influenza, and cholera. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 422 or MICB 388E.